Collegian

Dancing with the Stars

The first time Joy Spears stepped onto a stage she didn’t want to get off. She was 3 years old, her dance number at the Christmas show had finished, and although all the other kids had filed off at the end of the song, she remained standing in front of her audience in a little… Read more »

Literature in the Making

On Being a Writer It takes a certain kind of bravery to be a writer. There are the obvious challenges—the sobering chance of success, the dismal publishing landscape—but also the not-so-obvious: the hard, lonely hours spent piecemealing thoughts and words, the gut-wrenching feeling of having a publication accept your work only to learn later that… Read more »

Making “The Philadelphia Story”

On Valentine’s Day, more than 200 people ushered into the Marian Gallaway Theatre to watch 19 actors and actresses turn back time to 1939, when a young wealthy perfectionist named Tracy Lord was getting married for the second time. The 150-minute production took the cast two months to prepare—from memorizing lines and blocking stage directions… Read more »

Composing across the Globe

Half an hour before the premiere of a 5-minute marimba solo he created, then freshman Tyler Entelisano was sitting in Dr. Amir Zaheri’s office in the Moody Music Hall. It was the first time one of his compositions would be played for a live audience, and it was his first week in college. Not surprisingly,… Read more »

More than the Brownie

Famous for the photos he took on his small Brownie camera, William Christenberry captured a poignant vision of Alabama. In fact, in 2013, William R. Ferris, the former chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, referred to Christenberry as one of the three most important photographers of the South. His work recorded the decay… Read more »

Improving Veteran Life

Over the last twenty years, the quality of nursing-home care across the nation has changed dramatically. Residents have more choices over their accommodations, their food, and their schedules than ever before; but when Dr. Lynn Snow, an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at UA, a principal faculty member in the Alabama Research Institute… Read more »

Volcanic Ashfall

  When volcanoes erupt, molten rock called magma is ejected into the air where it cools and becomes volcanic ash—bits of jagged rock and glass sometimes no bigger than a few micrometers in diameter. But this ash isn’t like the ash leftover in a charcoal grill or a campfire; it’s hard, and depending on where… Read more »

Mirrors and Mangroves

Though Dr. Ryan Earley has flown to coasts off the Caribbean Sea at least once a year for the last seven years, his meccas are not the places most tourists want to see. Instead of lying out on luxurious sandy beaches and swimming in crystal clear water, Earley spends his time knee-deep in the dark… Read more »

Tiny Giant

There are three things always at the tip of Pam McCollough’s tongue—The University of Alabama, adversity, and her mom. In the fall, especially, the University rolls off her tongue like drumsticks on a snare beginning the national anthem, and rightfully so. Since 1984, the year she graduated from law school, it’s been her tradition to attend nearly… Read more »

Ancient Artifact

When a Torah scroll salvaged from the Holocaust came to the Temple Emanu-El, located just west of the Frank Moody Music Building, Drs. Paul Aharon and Steven Jacobs—both UA professors and members of the local Jewish congregation—wanted to know more about the scroll and when it was created. With the permission of the Westminster Synagogue… Read more »